The Human Dimensions Subcommittee of NABCI grew out of the rising interest among many conservation partners in integrating the science and tools of human dimensions into the business of bird conservation.Its work aims to enable bird conservation partners to do just that by:

  • Building social science capacity in the world of bird conservation;
  • Developing an understanding, through social science, of how to support birdwatchers, natural resource managers, and other key audiences interested in bird conservation;
  • Working with the US Fish and Wildlife Service Branch of Human Dimensions and other partners, to provide resources and trainings to strengthen the social science capacity of bird organizations;
  • Collaborating with the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and other partners to survey hunters, birdwatchers, and the public to better understand their contributions and interests related to bird conservation.

What is human dimensions? Human dimensions, defined broadly, is: “everything in conservation that is not about wildlife and habitats” (adapted from Decker, Riley, & Siemer, 2012). Or, more specifically, human dimensions includes what people think and do related to conservation, an understanding of why, incorporation of that understanding into decision making policies and programs, and evaluation of results. Thereby, human dimensions research is social science research related to natural resources or conservation. The research pulls from many disciplines, including psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, communications, education, geography, social marketing, recreation and leisure, political science, and planning. – Excerpt from the article “The Human Dimensions of Bird Conservation” by Dr. Ashley Dayer in the All Bird Bulletin

The Human Dimensions Subcommittee of NABCI grew out of a workshop (Exploring the Human Dimensions of Bird Conservation) hosted by the U.S. NABCI Committee in the Spring of 2013. This workshop brought together human dimensions research experts, who vary in their theoretical approaches, with agency leaders, who use human dimensions information to achieve their conservation goals. The insights from that workshop were documented in an All Bird Bulletin issue (Spring 2013).

Projects, Products, and Resources

Membership

Tammy VerCauteren, Chair
Bird Conservancy of the Rockies

Ashley Gramza, Co-Chair
Virginia Tech

Additional Members: John Alexander – Klamath Bird Observatory, Scott Anderson – North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Wilhelmina Bratton – U.S. Forest Service, Dave Case – DJ Case & Associates, Andi Cooper – Ducks Unlimited, Ashley Dayer – Virginia Tech, Chris Deets – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jennie Duberstein – Sonoran Joint Venture, Todd Fearer – Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture, Ann Fortschen – Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Jeffrey Gordon – American Birding Association, Elsa Haubold – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jonathan Hayes – Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative, Rich Iovanna – Farm Services Agency, Megan Jones – Colorado State University, Joel Jorgensen – Nebraska Game and Parks, Andy Raedeke – Missouri Department of Conservation/NAWMP, Terrell Rich – Environmental Consultant, Judith Scarl – NABCI/AFWA, NABCI Coordinator, Rudy  Schuster – U.S. Geological Survey, David Scott – Texas A&M, Natalie Sexton – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ted Toombs – Environmental Defense Fund, Kelly VanBeek – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.